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Signs of neglect

Visiting Ramsar Sites in Victoria can be a shocking experience, doing so a few weeks before the start of yet another duck shooting season adds to the distress.

Ramsar Sites in Victoria

Despite the claims of some Victorian politicians and their public servants that the slaughter of waterbirds on Ramsar sites is an economic benefit it is likely that the precise opposite is the case.

The rainbow in the desert

When it rains in the dry places in Central Australia, every drop is precious, it means more water in the waterholes, so important for the animals that live here.

Finke River journey

It is November. On this journey we begin by travelling along Ellery Creek (from Wallace Rockhole) and join the Finke River at the confluence of the two. At this point both rivers are dry.

Bryans Swamp

Parks Victoria describe Bryans Swamp as a wildlife reserve.

John Wolseley: Art and Nature

In a creek in the Northern Territory, each small creature’s life world is interwoven to produce an ecosystem vibrating with life.

A monsoon Christmas

We take you back to 2015 and a monsoon Christmas.

Where will you go?

Water, water everywhere and not a drop to drink.

Children’s Ramsar

Japan, which joined the Ramsar Convention in October 1980, has 53 Ramsar sites, many in the Japanese wild of Hokkaido.

Ramsar Sites in South Australia

Australia's 66 Ramsar sites cover more than 8.3 million hectares.

In a fading light, a vanishing

We take some time to track down some of the animals that still survive. Gentle, beautiful and precious, each and every one.

Eastern Water Dragon

Water Dragons are strong swimmers and can be seen catching the sun near waterways, stretched out on overhanging branches or nearby rocks.

Turtle time

Turtles are ancient indeed, today’s species, almost unchanged since the appearance of their ancestors 245 million years ago.

Jellyfish

Jellyfish have been swimming in the world’s oceans and seas for more than half a billion years.

How the Bäru saved the sea

At the camp Waka also discovered the severed head of a Saltwater Crocodile (Bäru) in a hessian bag.

Victoria's Ramsar Sites

Another natural catastrophe is unfolding on Australia’s internationally protected Ramsar Wetlands.

The Whale savers

More than half of all Whale species either visit or live in Australian waters.

Signs of neglect

Visiting Ramsar Sites in Victoria can be a shocking experience, doing so a few weeks before the start of yet another duck shooting season adds to the distress.

Ramsar Sites in Victoria

Despite the claims of some Victorian politicians and their public servants that the slaughter of waterbirds on Ramsar sites is an economic benefit it is likely that the precise opposite is the case.

The rainbow in the desert

When it rains in the dry places in Central Australia, every drop is precious, it means more water in the waterholes, so important for the animals that live here.

Finke River journey

It is November. On this journey we begin by travelling along Ellery Creek (from Wallace Rockhole) and join the Finke River at the confluence of the two. At this point both rivers are dry.

Bryans Swamp

Parks Victoria describe Bryans Swamp as a wildlife reserve.

John Wolseley: Art and Nature

In a creek in the Northern Territory, each small creature’s life world is interwoven to produce an ecosystem vibrating with life.

A monsoon Christmas

We take you back to 2015 and a monsoon Christmas.

Where will you go?

Water, water everywhere and not a drop to drink.

Children’s Ramsar

Japan, which joined the Ramsar Convention in October 1980, has 53 Ramsar sites, many in the Japanese wild of Hokkaido.

Ramsar Sites in South Australia

Australia's 66 Ramsar sites cover more than 8.3 million hectares.

In a fading light, a vanishing

We take some time to track down some of the animals that still survive. Gentle, beautiful and precious, each and every one.

Eastern Water Dragon

Water Dragons are strong swimmers and can be seen catching the sun near waterways, stretched out on overhanging branches or nearby rocks.

Turtle time

Turtles are ancient indeed, today’s species, almost unchanged since the appearance of their ancestors 245 million years ago.

Jellyfish

Jellyfish have been swimming in the world’s oceans and seas for more than half a billion years.

How the Bäru saved the sea

At the camp Waka also discovered the severed head of a Saltwater Crocodile (Bäru) in a hessian bag.

Victoria's Ramsar Sites

Another natural catastrophe is unfolding on Australia’s internationally protected Ramsar Wetlands.

The Whale savers

More than half of all Whale species either visit or live in Australian waters.